Welcome!


Welcome to labbydog.ca 2.0, A.K.A. Writerly Goodness on http://www.melaniemarttila.ca!

I could have multiple personality disorder.  Maybe it’s just an alter-ego.  I might be a mutt :)  You decide.

By day, I’m a mild-mannered corporate trainer.  By night, I brave the tyranny of the empty, or the not-so-empty, page and become Writerly Goodness.  So this blog will be dedicated to my two passions: learning, and writing.

Why not set up two blogs then, you ask?

Simple, because both learning and writing are part of my life, and neither is truly separable from the other.  They feed one another and converge in wonderfully serendipitous ways, all of which I’ll share with you.

My categories:

  • Alchemy Ink: my thoughts on process and the craft of writing, plus my weekly writing curation (Tipsday) and my weekly inspiration/research curation (Thoughty Thursday).
  • Authorial name dropping: interviews, workshops, conferences, retreats, and other places I’ve gone, the authors I’ve met, and what became of it.
  • My history as a so-called writer: how my creative life began and where it got me.  This won’t be purely confessional, though it will sometimes be agonized.  You have been warned :)
  • Work in progress: this is about the writing of my first novel and what it’s taught me (so far).  I won’t be excerpting from my work, but I will delve into aspects such as character development, world building, outlining, and revision strategies.
  • Select poetry: my published poems.
  • Excerpts of short stories: my published short stories. Not excerpts, as I had planned, but I can’t seem to change the category name now and until I have the time to create a new category and move everything into it, it stays :)
  • Wordsmith Studio Founding Members BadgeThis writer’s life. This is a new category and I am slowly moving my previously uncategorized posts into it. This is just a place to put in all those bits and pieces that don’t fit anywhere else. Most of my Nuala posts will be found here, as well as those posts about gardening, renovations, and other things that are part of this writer’s life, but may not be directly connected to my writing per se.
  • Breaking open the mind: my day job and the things I’m learning as a result of, or in spite of it.

So feel free to like, comment, share, follow my RSS feed, or subscribe by email.  I’m moderating, so it’s all good.

Other places you can get hold of me:

Recent Posts

Clean Reader, censorship, and political correctness


The big news of the week has been Clean Reader, which, despite the rumours, is still an app. Essentially, it’s an ereader that disguises what the creators of the app see as profanity.

There have been two camps among writers. One would rather their work not be read at all rather than have it read in an altered form, particularly when the alterations were made without the author’s consent. If the reader doesn’t like what the author writes, they have the right not to purchase or read it.

The other writerly camp concede that once the work is out in the world readers can and often do what they wish with it and as long as the author’s work is still being read and they are still being compensated for it, they’re okay with it (despite how repugnant they might find the practice of altering the work without consulting the author).

Here are some of the posts that have made it across my social media streams this week. (They’ll all appear again in my Tipsday post, BTW.)

As I mentioned on Facebook, on which I shared most of these, I’ll let you read through and decide what you think about Clean Reader for yourselves.

I will, however, share with you, why Clean Reader disturbs me.

It is censorship. No bones about it.

But censorship happens all the time in all of the arts, you say. This is true.

Profanity in television and movies is *bleeped* or dubbed when these shows are televised on network television during hours when impressionable young people might be watching.

There is a rating system for movies and while cinema employees may not strictly enforce it, they do have the right to turn away patrons if they are deemed too young to watch the movie.

Trigger warnings are plastered on music in various formats and there are usually “clean” versions of songs released for radio play.

Books are routinely banned because they are considered profane.

It was just a matter of time before categories for books (adult fiction, YA, children’s, etc.) became insufficient for some readers, or their parents.

I assume that Clean Reader is using the same conventions that allow the bleeping or dubbing of profanity in movies and music to justify the alteration of the ebooks they provide their readers.

It’s a choice and it’s a validated approach as much as I might disagree with it.

You might get the idea that I’m one of those writers in the first camp (above). You’d be right. If people don’t like what I write, they don’t have to read it. Not that every other word I write is a swear word, but I do write about sex, and body parts are also words that the creators of Clean Reader are not comfortable with.

It also smacks of political correctness (to me). It’s like some thought experiment. If we change the words, we protect those who might be harmed by them. If we change the words, we’ll prevent our children from becoming violent or otherwise behaving in a way we find unacceptable.

Big Brother, anyone? Maybe that’s overstating the issue, but I’ve always thought that common courtesy and thoughtfulness were more effective than political correctness.

Why does this concern me? Political correctness is another form of censorship. It all comes from the same, admittedly well-meaning, place, but truthfully, it doesn’t help anyone.

Those of you who have young children will know what happens when they learn their first swear word. Even if it’s something merely socially unacceptable like poopy-head or fart-face (kids often return from daycare or kindergarten with words like these) is it ever effective to forbid them from saying it?

If you’ve tried that strategy, you may have had a wee tyke running through your house shouting poopy-head at the top of her or his lungs. They do that.

More often, parents will have (sometimes repeated) discussions with their children to let them know that their words may make other people feel uncomfortable or hurt and that these words are not ones we should say without thinking about them and about the consequences of saying hurtful words to others.

Parents teach their children respect and courtesy. They teach their children to think before they speak. They teach their children about context and about human failings (you might hear Mommy or Daddy say a bad word when we’re really upset, but sometimes even we forget we shouldn’t say these things).

These early lessons can be the groundwork for more important issues that need to be discussed as children grow older. From bullying to bigotry, sexism to sexuality, words that some people find offensive are essential to these discussions.

We need to use our words, all of them, to provide our children with the tools that will help them mature into courteous and respectful people. We need to use sexually explicit terms to discuss the facts of life as well as alternative sexualities and the respect we all should have for them.

We can’t pretend vulgarity doesn’t exist. We can’t ignore bullying, discrimination, misogyny, or homophobia, and hope they’ll go away just because we don’t use “those words” anymore.

We need to teach people to be wise about their use of words.

I think that’s why Clean Reader disturbs me so much. It’s a dumbing down of language. Censorship of this kind is for people who think reading profanity will corrupt them. Censorship is for people who can’t or don’t want to trust their own judgement.

We can’t engage in meaningful discussion without words, and yes, that includes the bad ones.

It’s only my opinion, but I think my life would be diminished by the disappearance of profanity. If I’d never discovered the Shakespearean Insult Generator (and this is only one of many such sites) or Rogers Profanisaurus (they have an app now too), I would have laughed a lot less and my vocabulary would be significantly limited. Mind you, my sense of humour is distinctly scatological :)

I wouldn’t want to read, or write, in a world without profanity.

There are some books I’ve read and enjoyed very much that would not be affected at all by the censoring of profanity, but I couldn’t imagine enjoying Diana Gabaldon’s books (for example) half as much without it, nor would I appreciate someone editing out all the profanity in them.

If someone feels, however, that they want this service and that they can’t read books without it, I support their right to choose Clean Reader. I also pity them for feeling that Clean Reader was the only choice they could make.

Nerdmaste, my writerly peeps.

Muse-inks

  1. Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, March 15-21, 2015 2 Replies
  2. Tipsday: Writerly Goodness found on the interwebz, March 15-21, 2015 3 Replies
  3. My literary mothers and what they taught me Leave a reply
  4. Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, 8-14, 2015 4 Replies
  5. Tipsday: Writerly Goodness found on the interwebz, March 8-14, 2015 4 Replies
  6. Series discoveries: Anime 4 Replies
  7. Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, March 1-7, 2015 5 Replies
  8. Tipsday: Writerly Goodness found on the interwebz, March 1-7, 2015 Leave a reply
  9. The Next Chapter: February 2015 update 3 Replies