Tipsday: Writerly Goodness found on the interwebz, June 23-29, 2019

Welcome July! We’ve finally hit summer up here in northeastern Ontario. And it was just Canada Day (yesterday)! It’s time to celebrate with some informal writerly learnings 🙂

CanadaDay

Nathan Bransford explains how to handle multiple protagonists in a query letter. Later in the week, he shares a list of character strengths and weaknesses.

Julie Duffy says, creation is messy—and that’s okay. Barbara O’Neal is writing the next book. John J. Kelley lauds stories that liberate. Writer Unboxed

Abigail K. Perry examines James Scott Bell’s signpost scene #12: mounting forces. Brenda Joyce Patterson takes a deep dive into historical poetry. DIY MFA

Lisa Hall-Wilson wants you to make your setting real with strategic description. Tasha Seegmiller explains how to survive a writing crisis. Laura drake talks ideation: where do ideas come from? Writers in the Storm

Jenna Moreci lists ten reasons you’re not “making it” as a writer.

Again, Alexa Donne riffs on a similar theme: five reasons fiction writers quit.

K.M. Weiland shares four ways to write gripping internal narrative with the help of a brave critique volunteer. Helping Writers Become Authors

What does “plot reveals character” mean? Jami Gold has the answer.

Orly Konig proposes mind mapping as a pantser’s path to plotting. Fiction University

Oren Ashkenazi looks at six stories that focus too much on side characters. Mythcreants

Molly Templeton: YA Twitter can be toxic, but it can also point out real problems. Buzzfeed

Thanks for stopping by, and I hope you found something you need to help move your current creative project forward.

Until Thursday, be well, my friends!

Tipsday2019

Tipsday: Writerly Goodness found on the interwebz, Sept 16-22, 2018

Looking for some informal writerly learnings? Don’t worry. I’ve found them:

Vaughn Roycroft is writing through uncertainty (with a writerly life jacket). Writer Unboxed

Dave King: wait, what? The power of ambiguity. Writer Unboxed

Annie Neugebauer explains how to process and filter feedback. Writer Unboxed

Julie Duffy: self-doubt is not good. Writer Unboxed

Laura Drake proposes a writer’s resolution anyone can keep. Writers in the Storm

From Beyoncé to the X-files: allusion power on the page. Margie Lawson guest posts on Writers in the Storm.

Angela Ackerman visits Writers in the Storm. What’s stronger than your character’s worst fear? Their unmet need …

A.K. Perry explores another of James Scott Bell’s signpost scenes: doorway of no return #1. DIY MFA

Brenda Joyce Patterson shares some practical magic: voice in character creation. DIY MFA

Jenn Walton presents five conversations you should have with your protagonist. DIY MFA

Chuck Wendig says that a writing career is a series of cliff-mitigation exercises. Terribleminds

Faith Okamoto shares five tips for characters who go against the flow. Then, Oren Ashkenazi presents six sources of conflict for your world. Mythcreants

Jami Gold wants you to proactively avoid issues with a brainstorming check.

Jenna Moreci lists the top ten she looks for in a book (for personal reading enjoyment).

 

Erik Kwakkel tells the tale of two medieval selfies: me, myself, and I. Medieval Books

The Captain Marvel trailer (looks awesome!)

 

And that was tipsday. Come back on Thursday for your weeky dose of thoughty.

Until then, be well!

tipsday2016

My first virtual conference #WANAcon Feb 2014

This has been a week of firsts here at Writerly Goodness.

Yesterday, I posted about my first twitterview experience. Today it’s #WANAcon.

WANAcon

Over the last couple of years, I have attended several excellent online courses through WANA International, Kristen Lamb’s online writer’s university. Each course has been reasonable on the plastic, and I’ve invariably received great value for the money.

So, I thought, for the price of three or four individual courses, I could have the benefit of twelve, plus (!) It was a no-brainer, really.

Also, if I want, I have access to all the alternate sessions that I didn’t attend. Everything’s recorded, and I can view any of them any time I want (for a defined period of time).

I’m not going to give away any of the content, except to say that I recommend #WANAcon to anyone who wants an inexpensive alternative to a traditional conference. No travel, no hotel, no days-on-end of eating out, no time away from family or work. It really is a fabulous deal.

There were even pitch sessions, though I didn’t opt into them.

So here’s a quick rundown of the sessions I attended:

  1. Branding for authors – Kristen Lamb
  2. Self-editing for fiction writers – Marcy Kennedy
  3. OneNote: The solution to organizing your work – Jenny Hansen
  4. Writing effective inner dialogue – Lisa Hall-Wilson
  5. World-building 101 – Kristen Lamb
  6. An introvert’s guide to Twitter – Jami Gold
  7. Backstory: How your hero’s past shapes his future – Angela Ackerman and Becca Puglisi
  8. Creating compelling, unforgettable characters – Shirley Jump
  9. Build an author website without getting burned – Laird Sapir
  10. 7 steps to a stronger love story – Gabriela Pereira
  11. Rock your revisions – Gabriela Pereira and Julie Duffy
  12. Blogging for authors – Kristen Lamb

As you can see, there was a smorgasbord of Writerly Goodness to take in. Added bonus: You can do it all in your PJs 🙂

I’m feeling pleasantly buzzed.

What courses have you taken recently that were good value for the money? Tried anything new that turned out even better than your expectations?

Do share.