Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Feb 26-March 4, 2023

Monday is just a memory and tonight’s the full moon. Get ready to howl with some informal writerly learnings 🙂

Vaughn Roycroft discusses magic and spirituality in story. Then, Donald Maass asks you to consider Jack, in the box. Sarah Callender is trusting the process. And Liza Nash Taylor is hanging out with Honey Boo-Boo. Writer Unboxed

Is H.P. Lovecraft bad at writing? Tale Foundry

K.M. Weiland explains how to write a mystery. Helping Writers Become Authors

C.S. Lakin encourages getting “slick” with your novel’s theme. Live, Write, Thrive

Lisa Hall-Wilson provides ten examples of author intrusion in deep point of view and how to fix them. Then, Margie Lawson shares some writing rules to make you shine, not whine. James R. Preston: the boss fight, sherpas, and the devil’s in the details. Writers in the Storm

Why everyone hates the chosen one. Tale Foundry

Elizabeth Spann Craig discusses the differences between beta readers, ARC readers, and critique partners.

Stuart Horowitz explains the nuts and bolts of becoming and independent editor. Then, Grace Bialecki says, always read the acknowledgements page! Susan DeFreitas shares the two most critical tactics for getting emotion on the page. Jane Friedman

The surprising centuries-old origins of the unicorn. Fate & Fabled

Kristina Stanley and Lucy Cooke show you where to start a story edit. Then, P.A. Cornell lists ten things Lego has taught her about story building. Writers Helping Writers

Richelle Lyn offers a book coaching 101. Then, Sara Farmer shares more of her favourite mystery shows. Lori Walker interviews Dominique Richardson and Sorboni Banerjee about collaborating on a fairy tale-inspired YA series. Next, Stacy Frazer points out three common revision mistakes, and what to do instead. Monica Cox lists five tips for staying accountable during revision. DIY MFA

Tiffany Yates Martin discovers how Sherry Thomas revises: concentrating on the work. Fox Print Editorial

The trickster archetype: definition, examples, and how-to. The herald archetype. The shapeshifter archetype. The threshold guardian archetype. The villain archetype. Story Grid

Chris Winkle discusses doling out information during a scene. Then, Oren Ashkenazi analyzes Star Trek’s mediocre antagonistic species. Mythcreants

Thanks for visiting. I hope you took away something to support your current work(s) in progress.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well, my writerly friends.

Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Feb 12-18, 2023

Welcome to tipsday, where you can get the best of the week’s informal writerly learnings. Enjoy!

Ann Marie Nieves: so you’re interested in hiring a publicist. Jim Dempsey says, write for that someone special. Then, Barbara Linn Probst wonders what actually makes you a better writer? Writer unboxed

K.M. Weiland offers some tips on writing romance. Helping Writers Become Authors

C.S. Lakin explains what story hooks are all about. Live, Write, Thrive

Stories about stories about stories. Tale Foundry

Elizabeth Spann Craig reviews Amazon’s author page updates.

Roz Morris wonders, will AI writing threaten authors’ livelihoods? Nail Your Novel

Jane says negotiation is the one business skill she could grant all writers. Jane Friedman

Suzy Vadori helps you slay your bloated word count. Writers Helping Writers

Nathan Bransford says don’t dribble out morsels of information within a scene.

How to write dialogue. Reedsy

AK Nevermore defines science fiction and fantasy. Then, Lori Walker interviews Courtney Maum about genre-hopping, process, and time management as a working writer. Karmen Špiljak shares the secret ingredient. Next, Sebastián Calderón offers five techniques to connect with your novel. DIY MFA

Janice Hardy shares three ways “show, don’t’ tell” can strengthen your writing. Then, Lynette M. Burrows helps you create characters your readers love and hate. Eldred Bird lists five ways helping other writers helps you. Writers in the Storm

Jenna Harte explains how to find your readers. Fiction University

Tiffany Yates Martin: when will you be a success? Fox Print Editorial

Chris Winkle helps you judge what information your story needs. Then, Oren Ashkenazi analyzes five stories with disappointing prophecies. Mythcreants

Chuck Wendig considers AI and the fetishization of ideas. Terribleminds

Connor Garel explains why M. NorbeSe Philip declared war on her own book. The Walrus

Amna Khalid: the futility of trigger warnings. Persuasion

Thank you for visiting, and I hope you found something to support your current work(s) in progress.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well!

Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Feb 5-11, 2023

Hope everyone had a fabulous Valentine’s Day. It’s time to nourish your creative self with some informal writerly learnings. Enjoy!

Janice Hardy shows you how to fix pacing problems: move along. Fiction University

Greer Macallister says your book is always new. Then, David Corbett interviews Damyanti Biswas about transitioning from literary to genre fiction. Kathleen McCleary notes the things that define us. Next, Kathryn Craft shares four ways to organize your third person POVs. Tracy Hahn-Burkett explains how to come back to your writing practice after you’ve been called away. Later in the week, Erma Clare says, friend or foe, ChatGPT has pushed language AI into the spotlight. Writer Unboxed

Six signs your book is ready to query. Reedsy

Diana Stout talks critiques—how to get them and how to receive them. Then, Sandy Vaile wonders, are you writing a shiny idea or a robust story? Stefan Emunds talks about the importance of desires, goals, motivation, and needs in storytelling. Writers in the Storm

K.M. Weiland offers some genre tips on how to write fantasy. Helping Writers Become Authors

Is Yuki-Ona the most terrifying snow monster? Monstrum | PBS Storied

C.S. Lakin helps you understand the intersection of premise and protagonist. Live, Write, Thrive

L. Diane Wolfe is rapid releasing a series. Elizabeth Spann Craig

Nathan Bransford says, if you think writing is easy, you’re probably not very good at it.

How to create subtext. Shaelin Writes

Casey Cooper answers the question, why do speculative things matter? Then, Adam Burgess considers the triumph of Two Boys Kissing. Lori Walker interviews Jenna Miller about her debut author’s journey. Next, JD wonders, why write a palate cleanser? DIY MFA

Tiffany Yates Martin answers the question, should I include a prologue in a query? And other prologue FAQs. Fox Print Editorial

The craft of writing effectively. Though in the academic context and eight years old, it’s applicable to all kinds of writing. University of Chicago Social Sciences

Becca Puglisi considers the moral villain. Writers Helping Writers

Chris Winkle says that managing exposition starts with simplifying the story. Then, Oren Ashkenazi explains why Sauron works and Arawn doesn’t. Mythcreants

Kristen Lamb: ‘twas the night before Valentine’s.

Thank you for spending some time with me. I hope you found something to support your current work(s) in progress.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well, my writerly friends.

Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Jan 29-Feb 4, 2023

You’ve made it through Monday! Celebrate with some informal writerly learnings 🙂

Colice Sanders considers cultural content fender benders: the messy middle. Then, Disha Wallia suggests four plot twists for your second act. Gabriela Pereira interviews Monte Schulz about writing by the seat of your pants—without an outline. Next, Jennifer Dupree shares what she learned about publishing with a small press. Later in the week, Sara Gentry lists five ways numbers can improve your writing life. DIY MFA

A perfect anti-war movie? Like Stories of Old

Vaughn Roycroft shares some writing lessons from housebuilding and marriage. Then, Donald Maass presents other ways to write a hero. Elizabeth Huergo recommends Cecile Pineda’s writing “at the edge of being.” Next, Kathryn Magendie shares how an anxiety episode changed her (dis)belief in writer’s block … Writer Unboxed

What are the Endless? Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman. Tale Foundry

Janice Hardy shares five ways to raise the stakes in your scene. Fiction University

C.S. Lakin helps you develop a scene outline for your novel. Live, Write, Thrive

Shaelin shares her successful query letter. Shaelin Writes

K.M. Weiland shares five tips for how to return to writing after a long break. Helping Writers Become Authors

Becca Puglisi explains how inner conflict informs character arc. Then, Angela Ackerman offers a little body language help: fighting attraction in romance. Writers Helping Writers

Why Prometheus risked everything for humans. Fate & Fabled | PBS Storied

Ariel Curry and Liz Morrow help you create a book map for your nonfiction book. Then, Karen A. Chase explains how author platform connects to author brand. Jane Friedman

Miffie Seideman wants you to add a dose of relatable dimension to your character. Then, Jenn Windrow explains what happens when your obsession becomes your profession. Writers in the Storm

How to create compelling character backstory. Reedsy

Tiffany Yates Martin interviews Amulya Malladi about how she prioritizes writing. Fox Print Editorial

Chris Winkle says Wednesday failed The Addams Family, and it didn’t have to. Then, Oren Ashkenazi explains why the fights in The Witch from Mars are so boring. Mythcreants

Kristen Lamb helps you take your hero from “meh” to mythic.

Chuck Wendig unpacks the state of social media (as it pertains to writers in particular). Terribleminds

Marcus Schwabe interviews Vera Constantineau about Haiku Writing Month. Morning North | CBC

Thanks for stopping by, and I hope you found something to support your current work(s) in progress.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well.

Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Jan 8-14, 2023

It’s tipsday! Your chance to stock up on informal writerly learnings!

Nick Taylor explains how to create authentic queer characters. Louise Harnby

Kelsey Allagood wonders, how do you explain climate change to a magnolia tree? Then, Jim Dempsey explains how to write a successful novel. Juliet Marillier muses on the power of story. Next, Kathryn Craft points out three key places where stakes will shape your story’s meaning. David Corbett is writing cromulent dialogue. Writer Unboxed

The poem no one understands. Tale Foundry

Elizabeth S. Craig offers some tips on how to handle reviews as an author. Spunk on a Stick

Hannah Jacobson explains how to find the best awards for your book. Then, Lisa Norman wants you to EAT your heart out to empower your web site. Jenny Hansen points out the importance of great mentors (for you and your books). Writers in the Storm

C.S. Lakin points out the intersection of voice and deep point of view. Live Write Thrive

Joanna Penn interviews Roz Morris about how to (finally) finish your novel. The Creative Penn

Write your book in 2023. Reedsy

Ambre Leffler helps you use water’s superpower of creative flow in winter. Then, Angela Yeh says flash fiction is no flash in the pan. Neil Chase shares seven tips to create a unique sidekick character. Next, AK Nevermore lists five things feeding the lie that there’s no time to write. DIY MFA

Tiffany Yates Martin says backstory is essential to story—except when it’s not. Then, Hattie Fletcher answers the question: Is it OK to ask for before/after examples from a freelance editor? Jane Friedman

Sue Coletta helps you make an unbreakable promise to readers. Becca Puglisi offers some thoughts on writing insecure characters. Writers Helping Writers

Nathan Bransford shows you how to live creatively.

Tiffany Yates Martin asked an AI, what does AI mean for writers? Fox Print Editorial

Chris Winkle lists 12 sources of wish fulfillment for your story. Then, Oren Ashkenazi hosts another three-way ANTS battle between Severance, Andor, and Interview with a Vampire. Mythcreants

Kristen Lamb wonders, is writing a career or a hobby?

Rebecca Solnit: why we need new stories about climate. The Guardian

The Idioms: Largest idioms dictionary. Courtesy of David Corbett (above).

Amanda Perry covers the Griffon Poetry Prize shakeup: new rules, new controversy. The Walrus

Guy Kawasaki interviews Julia Cameron (for the second time) about her new book Write for Life. The Remarkable People Podcast

Thanks for stopping by. I hope you found something to support your current work(s) in progress.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well.

Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Oct 23-29, 2022

Welcome to November! This will be the last tipsday until December 13th (!) That’s right, I’m NaNoing again and foregoing curation until December. Get your fill of informal writerly learnings now!

You could always peruse the archives if you miss tipsday too much 😉

Vaughn Roycroft presents Murphy’s Law—the unboxed writer’s version. Elizabeth Havey: what was that phrase about authenticity? Kelsey Allagood shares what horror teaches us. Then, Sarah Penner is making the most of Canva with these seven design ideas for writers. Victoria Strauss explains when new isn’t better: the value of experience. Writer Unboxed

Clive Barker’s weirdest monster. Tale Foundry

C.S. Lakin stops by K.M. Weiland’s site: how writers can infuse mood in story settings. Helping Writers Become Authors

Over on her own site, Susanne discusses writing about difficult emotional experiences. Live, Write, Thrive

Then, Susanne explains how to quickly establish the setting in scenes. Elizabeth Spann Craig

How school makes you a bad writer. Answer in Progress

Kris Maze offers the ABCs of school author talks: how to engage kids. Eldred Bird: writing horror vs. writing terror. J. Alexander Greenwood is making a podcast love connection. Writers in the Storm

Why the Bechdel test isn’t enough. The Take

Manuela Williams suggests some revision strategies for your poet’s toolbox. Then, Dominique Richardson wonders, should you write a YA series today? John Matthew Fox lists five ways movies sabotage your writing skills. DIY MFA

Don’t force your characters to ask leading questions just so you can deliver exposition. Nathan Bransford

Ann-Marie MacDonald on her new novel Fayne and the stage adaptation of Fall on Your Knees. CBC’s Q

Elizabeth Sims lists 20 reasons everybody should write short stories. Then, Michael Mohr reveals the secret sauce to being a good writer. Jane Friedman

Rayne Hall explains how to write a spooky ghost story. Fiction University

Why ASL was banned in America. Otherwords | PBS Storied

Tiffany Yates Martin discusses peopling your stories (and your world) with individuals. Fox Print Editorial

Colleen M. Story shows you how to tell if you’re self-publishing your book for the right reasons. Writers Helping Writers

What makes a good story idea? Shaelin Writes

Chris Winkle shares lessons from the entitled writing of Yarnsworld. Then, Oren Ashkenazi analyzes five stories that fail at human resources. Mythcreants

Sir Salman Rushdie has lost sight in one eye, agent Andrew Wylie. BBC

Thank you for spending some time with me. I hope you took away something to support your current work(s) in progress.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well.

Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Oct 16-22, 2022

This is the final tipsday of October (!) Will you NaNoWriMo this year? I am. It will probably be another NaNo rebel combo, though I will be focusing on Alice in Thunderland. It might actually be a novella, though I’m not certain, yet.

In any case, it’s time to get your fill of informal writerly learnings. Enjoy!

Richelle Lyn is teaming up with other solopreneurs. Then, Jeanette the Writer explains what an editor actually does. Stephanie Dethlefs helps you get to know your ideal reader. Later in the week, Ashley Christiano offers five meditations to help you find your writing confidence. DIY MFA

Jan O’Hara discusses journaling and the writer (episode: man versus table saw). Then, Barbara Linn Probst is grappling with the awkward question of “women’s” fiction. Sophie Masson considers food in fiction. Writer Unboxed

Janice Hardy lists five ways dialogue can annoy your readers. Fiction University

K.M. Weiland reveals the nine negative character arcs in the enneagram. Helping Writers Become Authors

This fairy tale is an actual nightmare. Tale Foundry

Becca Puglisi lists the ingredients for a successful story climax. Margie Lawson says, here be monsters: writers beware! Lynette M. Burrows shares seven ways to increase your creativity through workspace design. Writers in the Storm

Jessica Conoley is writing through the impossible. Then, Hattie Fletcher explains how to avoid taking edits too personally. C.S. Lakin helps you use weather to convey mood in fiction. Jane Friedman

On her own site, Susanne shares tips on how to bring setting to life in your fiction. Live, Write Thrive

Marissa Graff suggests five micro-edits to hook readers on your first page. Then, Julie Artz shares her top three world-building pitfalls and how to avoid them. Writers Helping Writers

The Rings of Power has a narrative momentum problem. Like Stories of Old

Nathan Bransford wonders, can you see what is and isn’t on the page?

Tiffany Yates Martin explains how to speak as well as you write (part 2). Fox Print Editorial

Kristen Lamb reveals why we love, hate, and need horror.

Chris Winkle explains why you should consider present tense. Mythcreants

Roz Morris interviews Jessica Bell on making good decisions about cover design. Nail Your Novel

Louise Harnby answers this question: can I place a dialogue tag before the character’s speech?

How to prevent creative burnout as a writer. Reedsy

Hannah McGregor shares how her Harry Potter podcast made her a better scholar. The Walrus

Jeff Beer explains why Marvel’s She-Hulk finale is the best branded content of the year. Fast Company

Michelle Cyca interviews Ann-Marie MacDonald on exile, imagination, and her new gothic ghost story. The Walrus

John Garth explains how J.R.R. Tolkien came to write the stories that were the source material for The Rings of Power. The Smithsonian Magazine

David Routt: HBO’s House of the Dragon was inspired by a real medieval dynastic struggle over a female ruler. The Conversation

Thanks you for spending some time with me, and I hope you took away something to support your current work(s) in progress.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well.

Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Oct 9-15, 2022

Another week, another batch of informal writerly learnings!

LA Bourgeois says, imagination, engage! Then, Stephanie BwaBwa shares some marketing systems and automations to support your self-publishing career. Olivia Fisher is tapping into the hearts of kids: crafting authentic voice in middle grade. DIY MFA

Ann Marie Nieves answers your PR and marketing questions, part IX: do you twerk? Then, Jim Dempsey wonders, is your book any good? Kathleen McCleary is out of character. Kathryn Craft on story and death and life. Then, David Corbett is crafting an unforgettable villain with lessons from Louise Fletcher’s portrayal of Nurse Ratched. Writer Unboxed

How this became the sad girl era. The Take

K.M. Weiland shows you nine positive characters arcs in the Enneagram. Helping Writers Become Authors

Janice Hardy shares five fun ways to take advantage of your characters’ fears. Then, Ellen Buikema lists ten ways to start your story. Later in the week, Julie Glover discusses the hardest book she’s ever written. Writers in the Storm

Hank Quense helps you build your own digital planner with Scrintal. Elizabeth Spann Craig

Gaia, the mother of creation. Fate & Fabled | PBS Storied

Sue Coletta helps you construct the skeleton of your story. Then, Angela Ackerman says that the key to a successful NaNoWriMo is using October wisely. Later in the week, C.S. Lakin says less is more when it comes to describing setting. Writers Helping Writers

Jessica Bell points out the key elements of eye-catching book cover design. Joni B. Cole: you have a great idea for a story. Where do you start? Catherine Baab-Maguira explains why it’s better to write about money, not for money. Jane Friedman

Preptober tips! Do these ten things before NaNoWriMo. Reedsy

Nathan Bransford answers the question, “When should I stop sending query letters?”

Kristen Lamb considers motivation and how what drives us defines us.

Tiffany Yates Martin: how to speak as well as you write, part 1. Fox Print Editorial

Chris Winkle considers movement, the 2,300-year-old story principle. Then, Oren Ashkenazi analyzes five stories undermined by their epilogues. Mythcreants

Roz Morris: becoming you—how to develop confidence as a writer. Nail Your Novel

Overcoming perfectionism as a writer. Shaelin Writes

Sahar Arshad: from Never have I Ever to Bridgerton, the Desi girl era is here at last. Teen Vogue

Matthew Vogt: pantheon of superheroes. JSTOR Daily

Joyce Kinkead recounts the 5,000-year history of writer’s block. The Conversation

Jordan Pruett wonders, what counts as a bestseller? Public Books 

KC Hoard conducts a roundtable with designers: book cover confidential. The Walrus

Thanks for stopping by, and I hope you found something to support your current work(s) in progress, whatever stage they’re at.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well.

Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Sept 25-Oct 1, 2022

Welcome to October! Energize yourself for the rest of the week with some informal writerly learnings.

Tiffany Yates Martin explains why plots fail. Then, Amanda Miller shares five ways to use community marketing for your book. Jane Friedman

Jenny Hansen suggests a strength-based approach to writing. Then, Lisa Hall-Wilson explains why rhetorical questions help you go deeper with emotions. Eldred Bird is writing through life’s storms. Writers in the Storm

C.S. Lakin helps you show the world through your character’s senses. Live, Write, Thrive

Angela Ackerman says, if you want lifelike characters, create a character bible. Elizabeth Spann Craig

Sauron wasn’t always evil. What happened? The Philosophy of Tolkien. Hello, Future Me

Vaughn Roycroft talks turning points. Then, Kelsey Allagood shares decision trees, angry bees, and other writer brain hacks. Julia Whelan: I’ve heard such mixed things. Jeanne Kisacky wonders who are you reading now? Writer Unboxed

Becca Puglisi explains how to reveal a character’s inner conflict. Writers Helping Writers

Nathan Bransford encourages you to close off your protagonist’s easy off-ramps.

Richelle Lyn is designing a logo from scratch. Then, Melanie Bell offers five things to think about when writing a coming-of-age story. Barbara Rubin shares how she found balance between capturing joy, sorrow, humor, and rage in her writing. DIY MFA

Tiffany Yates Martin answers the question, how much should you plot your stories? Fox Print Editorial

Chris Winkle says storytellers must stop dehumanizing prisoners. Then, Oren Ashkenazi analyzes five overshadowed characters in popular stories. Mythcreants

How H.P. Lovecraft wrote the unimaginable. Tale Foundry

Nalo Hopkinson has won the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award. J. Wayne and Elsie M. Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction

Sean Wetselaar says Judy I. Lin’s recipe for success is fantasy and a cup of tea. The Walrus

Adrian Daub writes about losing oneself in the geography of fantasy worlds: here at the end of all things. Longreads

Guy Kawasaki interviews Min Kym about her book Gone: A Girl, a Violin, and a Life Unstrung. The Remarkable People Podcast

Jessica Winter explains how E. Nesbit used her grief, her politics, and her imagination to create a new kind of children’s book. The New Yorker

Check out Publishers Weekly’s annual publishing in Canada report. Interesting reading.

Thanks for taking the time to visit. I hope you took away something to support your current work(s) in progress.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well!

Tipsday: Informal writerly learnings, Aug 7-13, 2022

Welcome to another week filled with informal writerly learnings. Enjoy them on your porch or deck with some iced tea or lemonade as you soak in the summer!

Richelle Lyn is acquiring a virtual mentor. Then, Jeanette the Writer is applying the scientific method to writing and editing. Lori Walker interviews Sarah Adlakha about time travel and alternate timelines in historical fiction. Later in the week, Dominique Richardson explores the ins and outs of writing a young adult novel. Finally, Helen Scheuerer shares five tips for writing a successful series. DIY MFA

A procrastinator’s guide to finishing things. Struthless

Sarah Callender enumerates the perks and perils of pursuing approval. Jim Dempsey: writers have a lot too think about. Kathleen McCleary: to tell the truth. Kathryn Craft wants you to fill your writing life. David Corbett wonders what your character is hiding: the power of secrets. Later in the week, Yuvi Zalkow shares the fuzzy secrets to writing a decent novel. Writer Unboxed

Is Siren Head the ultimate modern monster? Monstrum | PBS Storied

Melinda Van Lone considers fantastic fantasy and scintillating science fiction covers. Then, Sarah (Sally) Hamer wonders how many scenes does it take to tell your story? Ellen Buikema offers some important font considerations for writers. Writers in the Storm

K.M. Weiland wonders how perfect does your structural timing need to be? Helping Writers Become Authors

Why villains love contracts. Tale Foundry

C.S. Lakin shares four steps to create perfect plot twists. Live, Write, Thrive

Tiffany Yates Martin explains how suspense and tension work together to increase story impact. Then, Sangeeta Mehta interviews agents Allison Hunter and Jennifer Weltz about how books are adapted for the screen. Jane Friedman

How mountains inspire mythology. Fate & Fabled | PBS Storied

Marissa Graff shares three tricks to reel in your readers with flashbacks. Then, September C. Fawkes explains why a strong plot requires a significant goal. Writers Helping Writers

Tiffany Yates Martin is having fun with query letters (no, seriously). Fox Print Editorial

Nine things to do before starting a novel. Shaelin Writes

Chris Winkle says your story needs tension, not violence. Oren Ashkenazi: Strange New Worlds reveals the danger of a theme-breaking plot. Mythcreants

The content genre: object of desire and values in story. Story Grid

Tim Hickson fixes Legend of Korra season three. Hello, Future Me

Emily Zarevich uncovers the hoax that inspired Mary Shelley. JSTOR Daily

Ada Palmer: the plotter vs. pantser divide has been exaggerated. Tor.com

Shashi Tharoor says the attack on Salman Rushdie is also an attack on freedom of expression. The Quint

Thank you for taking the time to visit, and I hope you took away something to support your current work in progress, whatever stage it’s at.

Until Thursday, keep staying safe and well, my writerly friends!