Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, May 5-11, 2019

Here is your video-free thoughty Thursday. It’s time to get your mental corn popping!

Mike Crawley reports on more Ford cuts: Ontario Telemedicine Network lays off 44 staff. CBC

Some good news: Parliament passes Charlie Angus’ motion to establish a national suicide prevention action plan. Kate Rutherford for the CBC.

Ben Lindburg interviews David Deutsch and Scott Aaronson about the plausibility of the time travel in Avengers: Endgame. The Ringer

Roy Scranton shares how lessons from a genocide can prepare humanity for the climate apocalypse. MIT Technology Review

Scott Rosenburg explains what Apple, Facebook, and Google really mean when they talk about “privacy.” Axios

Jared Lindzon reveals that 75% of staff at this successful IT company are on the autism spectrum. Fast Company

Emily Esfahani Smith: these deaf entrepreneurs are launching a tiny home retreat and they hope their hearing visitors leave enlightened. The Washington Post

Audubon’s Bird Note invites you to fall in love with the crow’s mating coos.

I hope you found something to spark your next creative project.

Until next tipsday, be well, be kind, and stay strong. The world needs your stories!

thoughtythursday2016

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Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, Apr 28-May 4, 2019

It is once more time to get your mental corn popping 🙂

Kaitlin Sullivan reports that neuroscientists have just brought pig brain cells back to life and how that changes our view of death. Popular Science

Karen Weintraub explains how scientists take a step toward decoding speech from the brain. Scientific American

SciShow Psych: can you become a morning person?

 

Jayshree Pandya wonders, are machines conscious? Forbes

Elizabeth Flock announces that the flip phone is back. Have people had enough of constant connection? PBS

Hannah Gadsby’s TED Talk: three ideas. Three contradictions. Or not.

SciShow Space News tackles the question of how fast the universe is expanding.

 

Liz Langley explains how bioluminescence works in nature. National Geographic

Catherine Zuckerman invites us to see the worlds oldest trees by starlight. National Geographic

Thanks for dropping by and I hope you found some inspiration in these links.

Until next tipsday, be well, be kind, and stay strong. The world needs your stories!

thoughtythursday2016

Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, Jan 6-12, 2019

YouTube has invaded thoughty Thursday, this week, but it should get your mental corn popping, anyway 🙂

Erin Winick: get ready for these rocket milestones in 2019. MIT Technology Review

SciShow Space wonders if there are planets even more habitable than Earth out there. (Spoilers: the answer is yes!)

 

Veritasium looks at how we determine the spin of a black hole and why it’s important.

 

Ephrat Livni looks at how physics explains why time passes faster as you age. Quartz

Signs of high-functioning depression that you shouldn’t ignore. BetterHelp

 

Ferris Jabr: how beauty is making scientists rethink evolution. The New York Times

Solving the mystery of the Great Unconformity. SciShow

 

What women with autism want you to know. Iris

 

Thanks for stopping by!

Until next tipsday, be well, be kind, and stay strong. The world needs your stories!

thoughtythursday2016

Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, June 3-9, 2018

It’s Friday eve! W00t! And now, to get your mental corn popping 🙂

Ashifa Kassam: the toxic legacy of Canada’s CIA brainwashing experiments. The Guardian

John J. Lennon: this place is crazy. A prisoner-journalist’s inside look at mental health in prison. Esquire

Katie Morton: how is ASD expressed differently in females?

 

Mihai Andrei reports that, after successfully passing trials, a Lyme disease vaccine may be available soon. ZME Science

Dirk Schulze-Makuch: fingerprints of Martian life. Air & Space Magazine

What Pacific Islanders want you to know. Buzzfeed video

 

State of emergency declared for Ontario’s turtles after hundreds are run over. Marina von Stackelberg for the CBC.

R.J. Wilson examines the reasons behind many of your dog’s interesting habits. URBO

We all know someone who can’t handle being hungry, AKA the hangry otter.

 

Have a lovely weekend and we’ll see you next Tipsday.

Until then, be well, be kind, and stay strong. The world needs your stories!

thoughtythursday2016

Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, April 22-28, 2018

It’s time to get your mental corn popping for the final push to the weekend. Yes! Tomorrow is Friday. And today is Thoughty Thursday 🙂

Stephen Luntz discovers that trees have a “heartbeat,” too. IFLS

Linda Poon: new “mutant enzymes” could solve Earth’s plastic problem. Are they any better than recycling, though? The proof remains to be seen. City Lab

Another promising solution? Saqib Shah: first ever ocean plastic cleaner will tackle the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The New York Post

Why so few people on the Six Nations Reserve have clean, running water, unlike their neighbours. It’s not just remote or northern reserves. We really have to provide all people with the necessities of life. Like, yesterday. CBC’s “Out in the Open.”

Alek Minassian, the Toronto van attack suspect, praised “Incel” killer. BBC

Psychologists explain why you should be friends with people who swear a lot. We’re more fucking honest and intelligent 🙂 Rachel-Lee Thomas for Providr.

Do essential oils work? And why? (I guess that second question gives away the answer to the first …) SciShow

 

Can exercise treat depression? SciShow Psych

 

Scientists may have discovered the root cause of autism (and no, it’s not vaccines). Let’s first seek to understand ASD before we attempt to eradicate it. IFLS

Sara Burrows explains how one Texas school beat ADHD by tripling recess. Return to Now

Nina Strochlic reveals the race to save the world’s disappearing languages. National Geographic

Going grey the right way: everything you need to know about grey hair. Katie Martin for HealthyWay.

Nadia Drake: how 1.7 billion stars were mapped with dazzling 3-D precision. National Geographic

Alfredo Carpineti: Study reveals Uranus smells of farts. IFLS

Baby elephant chases the birds, falls, and runs to mom.

 

I hope something in this mix inspired you (or at least entertained you).

Be well until this weekend’s next chapter update.

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Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, Sept 17-23, 2017

Last week’s technical difficulties meant fewer thoughty posts than usual.

Geoff Johnson reveals the threat of the great nutrient collapse. Politico

Sam Dylan Finch lists five ways to lovingly support someone who has C-PTSD. Let’s Queer Things Up

Numbers ‘were my mother tongue’: how autistic savant Daniel Tammet sees language. CBC’s “The Current” with Anna Maria Tremonti

This amazing tree shows how all languages are connected. Bored Panda

Brenda Knowles explains the trouble with over controlling our emotions. Space 2 Live

This artist draws her cat in 12 different styles. The Best Cat Page

I hope there was something in this small offering that got your mental corn popping.

Be well until the weekend.

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Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, April 3-9, 2016

I hope you’re all visual learners, ‘cause this thoughty Thursday’s jam-packed with videos!

It’s autism acceptance month 🙂

Photographer, Michelle Marshall, documents Afro-Caribbean gingers. Black Girl Long Hair.

Ten inspiring Muslim women every person should know.

 

Mike Veny: Mental illness is an asset. TED Talk.

 

A psychiatrist thinks the key to happiness might be swallowing the right bacteria. Business Insider.

Things about anxiety nobody talks about. The Mighty.

 

Six reasons why touch is amazing. ASAP Thought.

 

Vi Hart muses on the tools we use.

 

Crash course physics is here! Phil Plait for Slate.

The first photograph of light as both particle and wave. Phys.org

The music of the spheres. Literally. EWAO.

Jessica Cail on NOVA’s secret lives of scientists 🙂

 

WWF Hungary released this amazing video – Paper world. Vimeo.

It’s okay to be smart asks, how do bees make honey?

 

And for your entertainment:

MsMr – Wrong Victory

 

And Florence + The Machine. Queen of Peace & Long and Lost.

 

Enjoy, my friends.

See you on Saturday for an origin story and some anime series discoveries.

Thoughty Thursday

Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz, March 27-April 2, 2016

Here’s your thoughty for the week.

Buzzfeed features Katie Joy Crawford, a young photographer who has captured the essence of anxiety in her photographs.

Christine Denewith and Creigh Ferinas debunk eight myths about autism. Everyday Feminism.

Steven W. Thrasher says, don’t tell cancer patients what they could be doing to cure themselves. It’s our urge to do something to help that bites us in the butt here. Just be there. Take care of their kids for a while. Offer to do the running around for an exhausted partner. Hug them, if they can bear it. The Guardian.

Katie Roiphe explores the beauty of our final moments. CBC’s Q.

Silence may help to regenerate brain cells among other important functions. LifeHack.

Dublin observes the Easter Rising centenary. Irish Central.

Lifebuzz shares amazing footage of the Himalayas.

Take a virtual visit to Iceland’s Museum of Witchcraft. ScoopWhoop.

Australia’s Carnegie CETO wave power generator.

 

Yes. I confess I was attracted to this article by the word ‘unicorn’ (is it any relation to the badass unicorn?) but this rhino ancestor is still amazing. Shaena Montanari for Forbes.

Japan’s Hitomi satellite disappears and reappears mysteriously. Gizmodo.

This is the most detailed map to date of our place in the universe. Vimeo.

Hubble reveals the heart of the Milky Way. Phil Plait for Slate.

Do ravens know what you’re thinking? The California Academy of Sciences.

Your kawaii of the week: orphaned magpie bonds with boy. Photography by Cameron Bloom. This is Colossal.

Costa Rica’s land of the stray dogs is heaven for the unwanted. Bored Panda.

Not as extensive as Tipsday this week, but still, a solid showing in the brain pan department 😀

See you on Saturday for some series discoveries.

Thoughty Thursday

Thoughty Thursday: Things that made me go hmmmm on the interwebz May 4-17, 2014

A.K.A. Catching up on the catching up.

Just a little of the thoughty today. Far more fun.

How a bacterium was engineered to use two ‘alien’ bases, from Nature.

How an autistic boy’s love of wind chimes grew into something wonderful. Upworthy.

A Psychiatric Times article on creativity and mental illness. Interesting stuff about writers in particular.

Kevin Briggs’s TED talk on suicide.

 

Look up. Spoken word awesome by Gary Turk.

 

What you see in the mirror. A comic by The Oatmeal.

How one little letter can raise your IQ. Really?

Love these fantastic children’s rooms. In fact, I want the Narnia one!

Mary Robinette Kowal sings “Roxanne” in a puppet voice, while dressed in a Regency gown (which she made herself). Brilliant!

Another cover of Pharell’s “Happy.” A bunch of dogs and a cat frolic on the beach.

Cows like jazz. Who knew?

Carly Rae Jepson’s “Call Me Maybe” a la Star Wars. Just fun.

 

The kakapo is a rare, flightless parrot. Watch this hilarious video to find out what it did to a photographer. Plus, Stephen Fry 🙂

Enjoy, my writerly friends.

Thoughty Thursday

Ad Astra 2014 day 3: Biotech, identity, and personal freedom

Panellists: Alison Sinclair; Shirley Meier

SM: Everyone is terrified of the loss of control. We use plague zombies to explain our fear. Dracula was about the fear of women’s power and blood magic. One of our biggest fears in biotechnology. There are a couple of good TED talks on the subject (Mel’s note: I found this one and this other one). Chemotherapy can be delivered directly to the tumour.

AS: Spider Robinson wrote about electrodes implanted in the pleasure centre of the brain. In the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode, “Crossroads,” the Federation becomes a dystopia. The Borg are biological machines. In Star Trek: Voyager, 7 of 9 and Hugh explore these ideas.

SM: The essential questions are: Who am I? Who owns my thoughts?

Q: In Brave New World, what was horrifying then is common place now. People fear science. What’s the positive side of biotechnology?

SM: In my books, MOM (the medical override module) is corrupted. Technology is what saves people, frees them from the villain, Prime. Pets are modified into true companions. Of course, then you have the issue of old age, disease, and how you can justify putting the dog down. They rejuvenate animals, mammals specifically.

Q: What about clones? Currently they age rapidly to the age of the animal they were cloned from.

AS: Medical technology is always advancing. Right now, they’re working on cloning the heart. The brain is still too much of a mystery. Is it ethical to “treat” mental illness? How does the process impinge on personal freedom?

SM: Heart surgeons have noticed personality changes after bypass surgery. There is a distinctive decrease in, or complete loss of, empathy.

Q: Who should be afraid of biotechnology? Who will suffer?

SM: We add to our knowledge; we don’t replace it. The old doesn’t disappear. Norms shift.

Q: Do you have statistics regarding the percentage of personality change in heart transplant patients?

SM: It was in a Smithsonian Magazine article. The percentage isn’t certain. They’re not even sure why it happens. It might be a drug interaction.

Q: If we look at biotechnology rationally, our fear is relatively low. Irrational fear is automatically high, however. People forget our own criminal predisposition.

SM: Look at the military. They have drills for the nuclear fighter jets frequently. They have to make sure that all is in readiness in case the worst happens. They don’t run in these drills. They walk slowly. If the jets take off, the world will probably end. The ground crew is assessed. If they don’t react appropriately, they will be removed. When we write SF, we are troubleshooting. What if? Utopias are boring. Consider the controversy over stem cells.

AS: But what about the cost? We need to invest in quality control. In our society, who can afford it? In Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon, the main character is autistic and offered a cure. Who chooses?

Q: What do you consider “you”?

AS: My mother has Alzheimer’s. Her personality hasn’t changed yet, but layers of memory get stripped off.

SM: Treatment is not the same as a cure. It makes illness tolerable. There’s a loss of dignity in Alzheimer’s that’s difficult to deal with. In the early stages, patients can be mistakenly addressed as if they are in the advanced stages. They don’t need that.

Q: There’s a tension between internal and external identity. Who we are vs. who others think we are. Is it the same person? I’m thinking of Heinlein’s Puppet Masters.

AS: Do we have a problem with free will?

SM: Yes. Our monsters steal our free will. Truth, justice, and the American way vs. the New World Order.

Q: What about mind control?

SM: Noam Chomsky’s Manufacturing Consent is a fascinating look at mind control and possession in our society.

AS: There’s also a struggle between personal and medical personhood.

SM: Why do things not work? We’re essentially monkeys. Would you give a monkey “the button”?

AS: Technology both reinforces and subverts existing power structures.

And that is the last session I attended at Ad Astra this year.

I’ll save the wrap post for next weekend.

In the meantime, have a fabulous weekend, my writerly peeps. I’ll be back on Tuesday with my regular Tipsday curation.